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Shaping the Furture - Case Studies in Adaptation and Reuse in Historic Urban Environments

2012

Documents:

Heritage-led regeneration through reuse presents an opportunity to encourage the enhancement and protection of both the existing built heritage and the wider historic building stock. Part of that protection will encompass renovation and renewal in order to accommodate new and current uses, which in turn should enhance the longevity of the structures concerned. In conclusion, the sustainable management and conservation of Ireland’s built heritage can assist in the country’s continued economic recovery. Incorporating specific and coherent policies in the development plan process can assist in this regard, as outlined in the various case studies in this manual. This goes beyond protection of an area’s built heritage or the preservation of the character of a locality as ends in themselves. The built environment, including structures of architectural heritage merit, has been constantly adapted to accommodate new societal needs and requirements. There is a need to properly integrate this heritage into future plan-making and forward planning strategies. This approach will support local communities in their quest for development and adaptation, while retaining the qualities and values linked to their history and the collective memory of their locality.

GPA Annual Report 2011-2012

2011

Documents:

The key priorities for 2011-2012 were the on-going support of the Government Policy on Architecture Advisory Committee (GPAAC) and the supporting Government Policy on Architecture Implementation Group (GPAIG). An initial 20 priority actions had been identified from the overall 45, implementation of which began in 2010. These priority actions deal with specific areas such as built environment research, public awareness, policy development in urban design and sustainable development.

Government Policy on Architecture

2009 - 2015

Documents:

The Government Policy on Architecture 2009-2015 was launched in October 2009 and provides the appropriate framework for architectural policy up to 2015 and beyond and is led centrally by Built Heritage and Architectural Policy. The policy places an emphasis on sustainable development of the environment and urban design, incorporates architectural heritage in a holistic integrated manner, and encourages and supports high quality modern architecture. The policy complements and supports the Government’s wider economic strategy within the Programme for Government in areas such as built environment research and quality place-making.

GPA Annual Report 2009-2010

2009

Documents:

The Government through this policy on architecture and the built environment seeks to promote awareness and understanding of the contribution of good design to the daily life and well-being of society as a whole. High quality design, whether in the details of the buildings we work in, or in the spaces and places that we share socially, should not be viewed as a luxury, achievable on a one-off basis. The realisation of good architecture is fundamentally about much more than individual buildings. It must also concern itself with the realisation of an acceptable human environment for all. The key priorities for 2010 were the on-going establishment of the Government Policy on Architecture Advisory Committee (GPAAC) and the supporting DEHLG GPA Implementation Group, GPA IG. A meeting had taken place with key partners/ stakeholders and the initial 20 priority actions had been identified from the overall 45 to begin implementation in 2010. These priority actions will be initiated over the first two years and deal with specific areas such as built environment research, public awareness, policy development in urban design and sustainable development.

Action on Architecture

Action on Architecture

2002 - 2005

Documents:

Government Policy on Architecture aims to place architecture higher on the political and cultural agenda and in so doing to remove impediments to the achievement of a built environment of good quality. While a Government Policy on Architecture cannot, by itself, deliver good architecture, it can: recognise the social and cultural importance of architecture in society promote improvement in the quality of the built environment, by fostering conditions conducive to the production of good architecture and the protection of the architectural heritage, and by stimulating improved practice in both the public and private sectors promote the concept of sustainability in design, construction, operation, maintenance and improvement of buildings set an example for the community at large by the quality of what the State builds, and the care it displays towards the buildings it inherits promote high standards of environmental provision in local government, semi-State and private sectors through legislation, regulation and financial measures as appropriate help to create and sustain an ethos that values quality in buildings through education and encouragement.